Saturday, November 22, 2014

Japan field trip: all the gardens, all the time - from Peggy

Peggy had trouble emailing photos from her iPad, but once she figured it out, we get to see the collection of the gardens our guides visited.  I'm posting just one photo from each garden, not to break the blogger, but I hope that when Peggy gets back she puts all her photos on a flickr account, and I will link to it from here. THANKS PEGGY!!! aleks

The Sentō Imperial Palace (仙洞御所 Sentō-gosho?) 22 acres  is a large garden in Kyoto, Japan, formerly the grounds of a palace for retired emperors (Emperor Daijō). [...] Sento Imperial Palace was completed in 1630 for Emperor Go-Mizunoo's retirement, along with the corresponding Ōmiya Palace for the Empress Dowager Nyoin. Both palaces were repeatedly destroyed by fire and reconstructed until a blaze in 1854, after which the Sento palace was never rebuilt. More here....

Our guides in Sento Gosho Imperial Garden - 11/19/14


The Shugaku-in Imperial Villa (修学院離宮 Shugaku-in Rikyū?), or Shugaku-in Detached Palace, is a set of gardens and outbuildings (mostly tea-houses) in the hills of the eastern suburbs of Kyoto, Japan (separate from the Kyoto Imperial Palace). It is one of Japan's most important large-scale cultural treasures; its gardens are one of the great masterpieces of Japanese gardening. More here...

Shugaku-in Imperial Garden. Upper garden of 3 with pond a fabulous Shakkei - 11/19/14

The Katsura Imperial Villa (桂離宮 Katsura Rikyū?), or Katsura Detached Palace, is a villa with associated gardens and outbuildings in the western suburbs of Kyoto, Japan (in Nishikyō-ku, separate from the Kyoto Imperial Palace). It is one of Japan's most important large-scale cultural treasures.

Its gardens are a masterpiece of Japanese gardening, and the buildings are even more important, one of the greatest achievements of Japanese architecture. The palace includes a shoin ("drawing room"), tea houses, and a strolling garden. It provides an invaluable window into the villas of princes of the Edo period. More here...

Katsura Imperial Garden - Recognize the rocky peninsula? 11/22/14

Tenryū-ji (天龍寺?)—more formally known as Tenryū Shiseizen-ji (天龍資聖禅寺?)—is the head temple of the Tenryū branch of Rinzai Zen Buddhism, located in Susukinobaba-chō, Ukyō Ward, Kyoto, Japan. The temple was founded by Ashikaga Takauji in 1339, primarily to venerate Gautama Buddha, and its first chief priest was Musō Soseki. Construction was completed in 1345. As a temple related to both the Ashikaga family and Emperor Go-Daigo, the temple is held in high esteem, and is ranked number one among Kyoto's so-called Five Mountains.  More here...

Tenryu-ji: with hundreds of others to see the fall colors - 11/22/14

Ginkaku-ji (銀閣寺?, lit. "Temple of the Silver Pavilion"), officially named Jishō-ji (慈照寺?, lit. "Temple of Shining Mercy"), is a Zen temple in the Sakyo ward of Kyoto, Japan. It is one of the constructions that represent the Higashiyama Culture of Muromachi period.   Ashikaga Yoshimasa initiated plans for creating a retirement villa and gardens as early as 1460;[1] and after his death, Yoshimasa would arrange for this property to become a Zen temple. More here...

Ginkaku-ji - 11/22/14

Byōdō-in (平等院?) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Uji in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan.[1] It is jointly a temple of the Jōdo-shū (Pure Land) and Tendai-shū sects.  This temple was originally built in 998 in the Heian period as a rural villa of high ranking courtier Minamoto no Shigenobu, Minister of the Left. The property was purchased from Minamoto no Shigenobu's wife after he died by Fujiwara no Michinaga, one of the most powerful members of the Fujiwara clan. The villa was made into a Buddhist temple by Fujiwara no Yorimichi in 1052.  More here...

Byodo-in; Steve & Peggy joined several hundred at Byodo-in today (11/22) to see the Phoenix Temple with only a handful of non-Japanese in the mix.  It was 70 degrees and a gorgeous day!


No comments:

Post a Comment